Warrior Nemesis 2 Goalie Head Review | Lax Goalie Rat

Warrior Nemesis 2 Goalie Head Review

Warrior-Nemesis-2-Goalie-Head-Review

In this post I’m continuing our series of reviewing various pieces of lacrosse goalie gear. Next up is the Warrior Nemesis 2 review.

In case you’ve missed the previous gear reviews you can check them out here:

The Warrior Nemesis 2 is the newest item in Warrior’s line of goalie heads. It’s the 3rd goalie head they’ve produced and definitely an improvement over both of its predecessors – Warrior Lyte and Warrior Nemesis.

If you look at the goalie stick setup of the MLL pros you’ll realize that the Warrior Nemesis 2 is by far the most popular goalie head at the professional level.

Overall, its an excellent goalie head but one that’s more suited for more experienced goalies, in my opinion.

Similar to the STX Eclipse goalie head review that I did, let’s take a look at the Warrior Nemesis 2 in terms of shape and weight, flexibility, durability, and price.

Warrior Nemesis 2 Review: Shape and Weight

The Warrior Nemesis 2 weighs in at 12.4 oz (352 g) when unstrung.

While Warrior did shave off some weight from the original Warrior Nemesis (13.2 oz), the Nemesis 2 is still a little on the heavier side especially when compared to the STX Eclipse weighing in at 11.3 oz (320 g).

2 oz (32 g) might not sound like a lot of weight but trust me it does affect the feel of stick. Just like baseball players can feel the difference between a 32oz and a 34oz bat, you’ll definitely notice the difference in weight when using it to make your saves.

The Warrior Nemesis 2 has a different face shape than the STX Eclipse. Here they are side by side –

Warrior Nemesis 2 Review

The shape of the Nemesis 2 is more of a bowl shape than its Eclipse competitor. As you can see in the comparison above the Nemesis 2 is slightly bigger at its widest point but then is much more triangular in shape with a narrower bottom of the stick. The Eclipse has a more oval like shape.

Overall, the Eclipse has a larger save surface area than the Nemesis 2.

The sidewalls of the Nemesis 2 have a flared design which helps corral shots into the net of the stick.

The Warrior Nemesis 2 features SYMRail Twist Technology. This essential means that the sidewalls are hollowed out in a way that cuts down on the overall weight of the head, but does not do anything to compromise the stiffness and durability which I’ll dig into later.

Here are the measurements of the STX Eclipse and Warrior Nemesis 2 side by side –

STX Eclipse Warrior Nemesis 2 Comparison

The Nemesis 2 does have a good face shape, albeit slightly smaller overall surface area than the Eclipse due the narrower bottom of the face.

The flared sidewall of the Nemesis 2 allows for a lot of surface area to make saves and get that extra piece of plastic on the shot that can deflect a ball from the net.

The Nemesis 2 is also a breeze for stringers. It comes with 20 well placed, sidewall holes that offer many different options in stringing up your head. This beats out the 13 of the old Nemesis 1 and puts the Nemesis 2 above, or at least similar to the sidewalls of many of the other popular goalie heads.

The face shape allows for tighter channels to be formed, and is extremely customizable in that your local stick ninja can string up the Nemesis 2 to your exact specifications.

Warrior Nemesis 2 Review: Durability & Stiffness

Warrior Nemesis 2

This is an area where the Nemesis 2 outperforms the STX Eclipse – durability and stiffness.

The additional weight of the head translates into durability as the Warrior Nemesis 2 is an extremely durable goalie head.

The Nemesis 2 has a great stiffness, preventing a shot from bending back the plastic and going into the net. I believe this is the reason its favored by the MLL goalies and the top NCAA goalies who constantly face shots above 90 mph.

The STX Eclipse simply does not have the stiffness of the Nemesis 2. Shots that hit the corner of the Eclipse often find their way into the goal as the head bends and gives way. This isn’t the case with the Nemesis 2 which has the stiffness to stop the shots that hit the corner of the stick.

For this reason I recommend the Nemesis 2 over the STX Eclipse for goalies who are facing elite shooters like those at the MLL, college, and top club levels.

Or for goalies who simply cannot tolerate getting a stick on the ball and still having it go in the goal. This is one of the more frustrating moments for a goalie and if you can’t stand this situation, select a stiffer head like the Nemesis 2.

Since the top plastic of the Warrior Nemesis 2 is a little thicker than the STX Eclipse I’d give the edge in scooping ground balls to the STX Eclipse which features a very thin top plastic.

The rounded top plastic of the Nemesis 2 does create strong outlet passes. I prefer throwing with the Nemesis 2 versus any other goalie head I’ve used.

The stiffness and durability mean that the head will last. If you’re a parent concerned about the durability of your little goalie’s stick then go with the Nemesis 2 even though its heavier than the Eclipse, that heaviness translates into durability.

Additionally if you’re one of those goalies who plays their games in extreme weather (cold of the northeast or the heat of Arizona for example) you might favor the durability of the Nemesis 2 since it won’t get as brittle in extreme weather like the Eclipse tends to do.

Through snow, mud, heat, and rain you’ll notice that the Nemesis 2 keeps its shape.

Warrior Nemesis 2 in action

Warrior Nemesis 2 Review: Price

The Warrior Nemesis 2 typically goes for about $100, however you can currently get the white version on Amazon for just $72.15 (oops, this deal is over – the head is back to the $100 price).

Warrior Nemesis 2 Review

This is a great deal and puts in the Warrior Nemesis 2 in the same price range as the STX Eclipse.

Not sure how much longer that deal will last as the Nemesis 2 typically sells for $100.

The Nemesis 2 also comes in a variety of colors but these versions will cost you the full price.

warrior-nemesis-2-goalie-lacrosse-head-19

Even at the $100 price point I still think the Nemesis is a good deal compared to other heads at that price range like the STX Shield.

Although that initial price may be higher, the Nemesis 2 will be a great investment due to how long it will last.

Warrior Nemesis 2 Review Video

Here is Greg from East Coast Dyes giving his review of the Warrior Nemesis 2 goalie head:

Here is Mike from Total Lacrosse giving a Warrior Nemesis 2 goalie head review:

Warrior Nemesis 2 Review: Where to Buy

I prefer to get my lacrosse goalie gear from the online vendors vs. brick & mortar stores as they typically can offer the better deals.

Buy the Warrior Nemesis 2 unstrung on Amazon.com

If you’re in the market for a used Warrior Nemesis 2 or complete stick then check your local Craigslist under Sporting goods.

I do NOT recommend buying the pre-strung Warrior Nemesis 2 complete heads from Amazon. You’re not going to get a quality string job.

Much better to buy the unstrung head and learn how to string it yourself or have a local stick ninja do it for you.

Note: These are affiliate links so I’ll make a few pennies if you decide to buy through these links. No pressure of course and if you’ve enjoyed the articles here on Lax Goalie Rat feel free to support me buy making a purchase through these links.

Conclusion

Overall, I think the Warrior Nemesis 2 is a great goalie head and an extreme improvement over the previous Warrior goalie heads like the Nemesis 1 and the Lyte.

For those considering the choice between the Eclipse and Nemesis 2 I don’t think you’re going to go wrong either way. It’s really going to come down to your personal preference.

However if you’re looking for a little more stiffness and durability, go with the Nemesis 2. If you’re looking for a slightly larger surface area and a lighter goalie head, go with the Eclipse.

I typically recommend the Eclipse for younger players and the Nemesis 2 for more experienced players who have to face higher velocity shots.

For what its worth I also think the Warrior Nemesis 2 is aesthetically beautiful. I think the stick visually looks the best out of any lacrosse goalie head. So if that’s the tipping point for you, there you go.

Pros:

  • Great stiffness
  • Flared sidewalls channel shots into the stick
  • Fully customizable stringing options
  • Great with outlet passes
  • Best durability

Cons:

  • Smaller surface area
  • Heavier

Until next time! Coach Damon

Did I miss anything in this Warrior Nemesis 2 review? Let me know in the comments. 

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14 thoughts on “Warrior Nemesis 2 Goalie Head Review

  1. Hey Coach Damon, do you think you can review the Eraser 2 next? I’m using it right now but I feel that I should change to a different head and a second opinion couldn’t hurt. Thanks

    1. Hi Henry – Sure, I could do a review of the Eraser 2. I haven’t used that stick extensively like the Eclipse or Nemesis 2 so it may be awhile but I’m happy to put out a review of that goalie head after I play around with it some. Jordan Burke, ex MLL goalie used to use the Brine Eraser 2 so I know its not all bad. Coach Damon

  2. I wanted to point out another con that was not listed. Nemi 2’s tend to break on the inside of the side wall (the connectors in the middle). I have broken two of them where the plastic snaps after minimal use. My teammate for club lacrosse has broken many more of them the same way I have.

  3. I’ve been using the nemesis for a little bit now, and I’ve gone through 4 nemeses in the past 2 and a half years of college ball. Same place breaks every time: connector of one sidewall, then the connector of the other sidewall cracks.

    In your review you mentioned that the increased rigidity of the nemesis translates to longer life, and that’s not always the case. The sidewall connector is definitely the stress point that fractures first when consistently facing higher velocity shots. Don’t wanna go too deep into the physics behind linear collisions, so I’ll be very brief- flexible heads don’t break as easily because the force they encounter(from a ball) is spread out over a larger amount of time and a larger area of impact (google impulse-momentum theory or elastic & inelastic collisions if you’re up for it).

    I think your review is accurate for the lower levels of lacrosse, as I’ve seen youth goalies use a nemi 2 for 3-4 years without issue. But myself, other college athletes, and professionals can attest to the fact that these heads break easy when they regularly see fast shots, possibly BECAUSE of their stiffness.

    That being said, I’ve bought 4 of these, and I’m probably gonna buy a 5th one when it breaks. You’re absolutely right when you say this head’s stiffness will actually save the infrequent shot that bends a flexible head right into the net. I value this pretty much above everything else you can review on a head.

    The other thing that sets this head apart from the competitors is the unbelievable pockets you can string this bad boy up with. The smaller surface area combined with all the sidewall holes you need is a deadly combinations for your stick doctor or even novice stringers.

    Flip side of that coin, smaller surface area is a downside when it comes to saving the ball. But, like stated before, with no flex in the head, if you get a piece of it, its probably going to be a save with the nemi 2.

    So concluding,
    PROS: rigidity, stringing
    CONS: Durability at high levels, price, smaller surface area

    Great review Damon, and I think your conclusion is correct. This head really should be used by those at a higher level, but specifically those who can afford to buy a new one when it breaks quicker than other heads.

  4. Coach Damon, I do agree with every point you made supporting the Nemi 2. I have used both the Nemi 2 and the Eclipse and for me, my go to since I was a senior in high school has been the Eclipse. For this one reason, while I was using the Nemi 2 I thought that using a heavier head actually slowed my hand speed down by, in my preference, a noticeable amount. And for me, that is a big problem because from senior year to now I have faced faster and faster shooters so yes I do agree the Eclipse is a flimsy head but, the weight difference to me is the biggest reason why I like it more over the Nemi 2

    1. Thanks for adding that Flynn! Totally agree with you. I feel so much faster with the Eclipse vs. the Nemi 2. Eclipse is coming out with the Eclipse 2 pretty soon. I’ve seen pics but don’t have any details. We’ll see what that head is all about.

  5. Coach,
    My Son currently has an original Nemesis (his go to head), a Nemi Lyte (current backup), and I recently purchased a Nemesis II for him (which he is currently learning how to string). You state above that the Nemi II is an improvement over the prior versions, but without explanation as to why. Could you provide a few details as to your reasoning?

    Thanks!

    1. On further review, I think his main head is even older than a Nemesis, It does not have the sidewall rails. I bought it used when he first started playing in the goal several years back, and he seems to like it. Probably an antique.

    2. Nemi 2 has the Warrior Nemesis 2 features SYMRail Twist Technology which makes it a little lighter without sacrificing strength – upgrade. Nemi 2 is stiffer than original – some consider upgrade. It also has a lot more stringing holes to customize pockets – upgrade.

  6. Hey coach, I was considering buying the Nemesis 2 but I know that the Eclipse 2 just came out, do you think you could do a comparison of the two heads please? I’m a huge fan of the blogs by the way, love your posts!

    1. Hey Collin – Good idea. I did comparison of the Nemi vs. Eclipse originals but haven’t done the 2’s for each. Short answer is Nemi 2 is stiffer and sturdier but feels a lot heavier. Eclipse 2 is my favorite head and I actually don’t that much experience with the Nemi 2 but you see all over the MLL.

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